Why the Buffett Rule Sets the Bar Too Low

By:  Robert Reich

Next Monday most Americans will be filing their income taxes for tax year 2011. This year, though, tax day has special significance. If there's one clear policy contrast between Democrats and Republicans in the 2012 election, it's whether America's richest citizens should be paying more.

Senate Democrats have scheduled a vote Monday on a minimum 30 percent overall federal tax rate for everyone earning more than $1 million a year. It's nicknamed the "Buffett Rule" in honor of billionaire Warren Buffett who has publicly complained that he pays a lower tax rate than his secretary.

No one in Washington believes the Buffett Rule has any hope of passage this year. It's largely symbolic. The vote will mark a sharp contrast with Republican Paul Ryan's plan (enthusiastically endorsed by Mitt Romney) to cut the tax rate on the super rich from 35 percent to 25 percent - rewarding millionaires with a tax cut of at least $150,000 a year. The vote will also serve to highlight that Romney himself paid less than 14 percent on a 2010 income of $21.7 million because so much of his income was in capital gains, taxed at 15 percent. 

Hopefully in the weeks and months ahead the White House and the Democrats will emphasize three key realities:

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