Earth Day

The first Earth Day was held in 1970, the same year the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was created. Pollution spewed from Midwest smokestacks fell as acid rain across New England. Polluted rivers caught fire. Big cities were enshrouded in smog. There has been progress since then, but much more remains to be done to preserve our planet for future generations. Today's great challenge is global warming. Senator Bernie Sanders has been a leader in Congress of the push to significantly curb

The first Earth Day was held in 1970, the same year the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was created. Pollution spewed from Midwest smokestacks fell as acid rain across New England. Polluted rivers caught fire. Big cities were enshrouded in smog. There has been progress since then, but much more remains to be done to preserve our planet for future generations. Today's great challenge is global warming. Senator Bernie Sanders has been a leader in Congress of the push to significantly curb emissions of greenhouse gases. As part of the solution to climate change, he also has championed "green jobs" training programs to teach workers the skills needed to install new clean energy technologies. On the eve of Earth Day 2009, Sanders asked Labor Secretary Hilda Solis about the importance of "green jobs."

To watch the senator and Secretary Solis discuss "green jobs," click here.

Click here to learn more about Earth Day and the EPA.