Earth to Bush, Part III

Prices for food staples are going up. Eggs cost 19.5 percent more than in June, 2006, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Milk was up 13.3 percent; fresh chicken 10 percent; navel oranges 19.8 percent, according to the Labor Department. The price of white bread was 9.6 percent more than the year before. "Despite the Bush administration's continued pronouncements that the economy is going great, many Americans are feeling the pinch..." the Brattleboro Reformer concluded in an editorial,

Prices for food staples are going up. Eggs cost 19.5 percent more than in June, 2006, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Milk was up 13.3 percent; fresh chicken 10 percent; navel oranges 19.8 percent, according to the Labor Department. The price of white bread was 9.6 percent more than the year before. "Despite the Bush administration's continued pronouncements that the economy is going great, many Americans are feeling the pinch…" the Brattleboro Reformer concluded in an editorial.

"If you're rich, you can shrug off $3 a gallon gasoline or $4 a gallon milk. If you're not rich, every penny more that you have to spend on gas to go to work or for food at the grocery store is keenly felt," the editorial observed. "This is the real economic crisis in America , and few of our leaders seem to get this."

According to a McClatchy Newspapers account, President Bush recently "dismissed several polls that show Americans are down on the economy [and] expressed surprise that inflation is one of the stated concerns. ‘They cite inflation?' Bush asked at a meeting with economics writers. The newspaper report said president had a theory for why some people have such a gloomy view of the economy. "I happen to believe the war has clouded a lot of people's sense of optimism."

True enough about the war straining our optimism, but increasing numbers of people falling into poverty and the shrinking middle class might have a little more to do with the public perception that something is rotten. Not from Bush's vantage point, though. To him, the economy is "thriving" and "robust." So the question remains: What planet is he living on?

To read the Brattleboro Reformer editorial click here.

To read Earth to Bush, Part II click here - https://www.sanders.senate.gov/news/record.cfm?id=280845

To read the first Earth to Bush click here - https://www.sanders.senate.gov/news/record.cfm?id=280697