End the War

The Senate failed to break a Republican filibuster of legislation to end the war in Iraq. The vote was 52 to 47, a bipartisan majority but still short of the 60 votes that were needed under Senate rules. "The result was not a total shock, but we have to continue to be as aggressive as possible in order to bring our troops home as soon as possible," Sanders said. While the U.S. military has been focused on a savage civil war in Iraq, he noted, a new National Intelligence Estimate just made public

The Senate failed to break a Republican filibuster of legislation to end the war in Iraq. The vote was 52 to 47, a bipartisan majority but still short of the 60 votes that were needed under Senate rules. "The result was not a total shock, but we have to continue to be as aggressive as possible in order to bring our troops home as soon as possible," Sanders said. While the U.S. military has been focused on a savage civil war in Iraq, he noted, a new National Intelligence Estimate just made public concluded that six years after 9/11 that the threat of terrorist violence in the United States is growing worse and Osama bin Laden is and getting stronger.

Sanders was a cosponsor of the legislation that would order troops to start leaving in 120 days and complete the pullout by April 30, 2008. Under the bill, troops could remain to fight terrorists, protect U.S. assets and train Iraqi security forces. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid blamed the outcome on "dedicated obstructionists."

To see how all senators voted, click here.

Senators Leahy and Sanders at the candlelight vigil, click listen to the audio or watch the video.