Freedom from Want

Norman Rockwell painted Freedom from Want in 1943 while he lived in Arlington, Vt., a place the native New Yorker once likened to having "fallen into Utopia." "The peaceful enclave of Arlington offered Rockwell a simpler, quieter life and the comfort and connection of a community of artists and writers," according to Resource Library Magazine. The painting for the Saturday Evening Post illustrated one of the "Four Freedoms" President Franklin D. Roosevelt propounded in his 1941 State of the Uni

Norman Rockwell painted Freedom from Want in 1943 while he lived in Arlington, Vt., a place the native New Yorker once likened to having "fallen into Utopia." "The peaceful enclave of Arlington offered Rockwell a simpler, quieter life and the comfort and connection of a community of artists and writers," according to Resource Library Magazine. The painting for the Saturday Evening Post illustrated one of the "Four Freedoms" President Franklin D. Roosevelt propounded in his 1941 State of the Union address: Freedom from Want, Freedom of Speech, Freedom to Worship, and Freedom from Fear. This Thanksgiving Day, Americans counting their blessings might take a moment to remember that the United States has largest number of children living in poverty of any industrialized nation, a nation where the people on top are doing remarkably well while the vast majority struggle to maintain their standard of living. For too many Americans, Freedom from Want remains a goal.