Global Warming

From the United Nations to Capitol Hill to the White House, the climate change crisis is in the international spotlight this week.

On Monday at the U.N., Secretary General Ban Ki-moon told a summit on global warming that "the time for doubt has passed" and action is needed to reduce emissions of heat-trapping gases. President Bush, who opposes negotiating limits on greenhouse gases, skipped the meetings.

From the United Nations to Capitol Hill to the White House, the climate change crisis is in the international spotlight this week.

On Monday at the U.N., Secretary General Ban Ki-moon told a summit on global warming that "the time for doubt has passed" and action is needed to reduce emissions of heat-trapping gases. President Bush, who opposes negotiating limits on greenhouse gases, skipped the meetings.

On Tuesday on Capitol Hill, Senator Bernie Sanders chairs a hearing of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee on ways that millions of good paying "green jobs" could be created in the process of reversing global warming. The witness list includes a Vermont wind energy entrepreneur David Blittersdorf. The 2:00 p.m. hearing will be Webcast live at http://epw.senate.gov/public/ .

On Thursday and Friday at the White House, a summit of nations that are major emitters of greenhouse gases, including China and India, is being hosted by the United States under ground rules set by the Bush administration that make the sessions unlikely to yield serious results.

"The problem needs all the attention it can get," as The New York Times noted in an editorial, "But if talk is good, it is also cheap. And it will change nothing unless it leads to a real treaty with real, and enforceable, limits on the production of greenhouse gases."