Standing Up for Injured Workers

"Civilian workers who suffered devastating injuries while supporting the U.S. war effort in Iraq and Afghanistan have come home to a grinding battle for basic medical care, artificial limbs, psychological counseling and other services. The insurance companies responsible for their treatment under taxpayer-funded policies have routinely denied the most serious medical claims. Those insurers -- primarily American International Group -- recorded hundreds of millions of dollars in profits on this bu

"Civilian workers who suffered devastating injuries while supporting the U.S. war effort in Iraq and Afghanistan have come home to a grinding battle for basic medical care, artificial limbs, psychological counseling and other services. The insurance companies responsible for their treatment under taxpayer-funded policies have routinely denied the most serious medical claims. Those insurers -- primarily American International Group -- recorded hundreds of millions of dollars in profits on this business… More than 1,400 civilian workers have died and 31,000 have been wounded or injured in Iraq and Afghanistan. Yet unlike wounded soldiers…the civilians have to battle a federally supervised insurance system marked by high costs and excessive delays," according to the Los Angeles Times and the investigative journalism project ProPublica. Even before the article was published, Senator Bernie Sanders had asked the Labor Department to investigate.

ABC News put the findings in perspective. "Insurance giant AIG, the same company that rewarded its executives with millions in bonuses and spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on a spa retreat at an exclusive California resort and private jets, has been nickel and diming employees of private contractors injured in Iraq, with a pattern of denying and delaying their claims, a joint investigation between 20/20, the Los Angeles Times and the non-profit group ProPublica has found."

To read the article, click here.

To watch Brian Ross' report on ABC News 20/20, click here.

To read the senator's letter, click here.