The Big Three

The chiefs of the Big Three American automakers came back to Capitol Hill on Thursday to ask Congress for a rescue package that now totals $34 billion. Last month they tried but failed to secure a $25 billion bailout. This time, they offered more detailed plans to turn their companies around, including building more fuel-efficient and environment-friendly cars. And this time, the executives of GM, Ford and Chrysler drove the 520-mile trip from Detroit instead of flying the private jets that had

The chiefs of the Big Three American automakers came back to Capitol Hill on Thursday to ask Congress for a rescue package that now totals $34 billion. Last month they tried but failed to secure a $25 billion bailout. This time, they offered more detailed plans to turn their companies around, including building more fuel-efficient and environment-friendly cars. And this time, the executives of GM, Ford and Chrysler drove the 520-mile trip from Detroit instead of flying the private jets that had whisked them to the capital in the past. After two days of committee hearings, congressional leaders will decide whether the full Senate and House take up air for the auto industry next week. The American public remained dubious. A CNN/Opinion Research Corp. poll this week found 61 percent oppose major financial assistance for the carmakers, while 36 percent support it. That tracks the views of those who have taken our new online survey. What do you think?

To take our poll on the automotive industry, click here.