The Economy

Another 800,000 Americans slipped into poverty last year bringing the total to 37.3 million, according to new figures compiled by the Census Bureau. Since President Bush has been in office, 5.7 million more people fell into poverty. The median income for working-age Americans rose by $266 last year, but is still down by $2,175 since the beginning of the decade when adjusted for inflation. "We have the biggest gap between the rich and everybody else since the Great Depression," Sanders said Tues

Another 800,000 Americans slipped into poverty last year bringing the total to 37.3 million, according to new figures compiled by the Census Bureau. Since President Bush has been in office, 5.7 million more people fell into poverty. The median income for working-age Americans rose by $266 last year, but is still down by $2,175 since the beginning of the decade when adjusted for inflation. "We have the biggest gap between the rich and everybody else since the Great Depression," Sanders said Tuesday on the Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition.

The number of people lacking health insurance declined in 2007, but that was thanks to government programs, such as Medicaid. Private coverage continued to erode. Almost 46 million Americans did not have health insurance last year.

"The gains that occurred last year were welcome, but unfortunately, they are too little, too late," Jared Bernstein, a senior economist with the Economic Policy Institute in Washington, told The Associated Press. "The median household is no better off now than they were back in 2000."

To learn more about the Census Bureau report, click here.

To listen to Vermont Edition, click here.

To read a statement on the new census bureau data by Robert Greenstein, executive director of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, click here.